Teachers have a lot on their minds in late August. Most are torn between anxiously prepping for a new batch of incoming students, and wistfully daydreaming about their trip to Cape Cod last June.

There isn’t time to carefully go over every detail of the administrative paperwork that will be coming across teachers’ desks over the next month. If you don’t fill and sign as quickly as possible, you could end up with an inbox piled high by September.

With that kind of pressure during back-to-school time, the teachers’ union has you right where it wants you: in a hurry, without the time or energy to think about whether you want to spend over $700 on union dues—which is really a euphemism for whatever political causes union executives happen to favor.

It’s time for teachers to start paying attention.

Two months ago, the Supreme Court ruled in Janus v. AFSCME that all union activity is inherently political (even collective bargaining, which involves negotiating over how tax dollars are spent). The the union gets when new members sign that form is a political donation.

And donations are voluntary, right?

At least they should be. But the PSEA hopes that when your union contract talks roll around, you won’t think twice about forking over the “customary” dues they’ve been collecting from about 143,000 public school educators in the state. (Ditto for AFT-PA, which has over 25,000 members). You’ll be so busy with students that paying their dues collection will feel automatic.

If you’re a public school teacher who wants to stop paying for union politics, the Supreme Court says that’s your constitutional right. Free to Teach hosts an easy three-step process to help you resign union membership and stop paying for politics you don’t like.

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